Write Up #1 A New York Heartbeat – Movie

Published May 6, 2012 by jesscorenn

Write-up #1

Performance – A New York Heartbeat/Film (Pre-release)

February 1, 2012

Director:

Tjardus Greidanus

Writer:

Tjardus Greidanus

Stars:

Escher Holloway, Rachel Brosnahan and Eric Roberts

 

This was a screening of a film that has yet to be released so the version we saw was a rough cut that hadn’t been Foleyd yet. The film stars Escher Holloway, Rachel Brosnahan and Eric Roberts, set in NY in the 50’s. The director & writer, stunt coordinator, and Producer were present in the theatre and after the movie, welcomed all comments and criticisms of the movie. The movie itself, although a rough cut, was dubbed well and the story was interesting if not cliché. The acting was both good and passible, depending on the character, and the romantic tension between the two main leads was missing, or maybe just stiff? I didn’t feel it, but I did like the story. I can’t really elaborate on specifics since it was a screening, but you can find the synopsis here at Imdb http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1692478/. We were happy to be able to experience the movie as a class and the cast and crew were genuinely interested in what we had to say. After the show, the class was invited to ask questions about the movie and then ask career questions to the actors. The stunt coordinator explained that he learned how to set himself on fire in various ways before becoming an actual stunt man in the movies. The whole experience was rewarding and it was nice to see the movie before it was released. We were invited to leave our information with the crew with the promise that we would be invited to the finished film upon release. I walked away knowing how difficult it is to see the vision of a movie come to fruition on the big screen. The numerous technical aspects of film are an enormous responsibility for those involved and even a well-financed movie may struggle to be seen. There wasn’t anything specific in the viewing that would influence my artwork. I have great respect for the crew and their vision and most importantly, how open they were to learning what we, as viewers, thought about their movie.

 

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